Tag Archives: insulin resistance

Healthy Trans Fats Slash Diabetes Risk

Healthy Trans Fats Slash Diabetes Risk

Is “healthy trans fat” an oxymoron?  Maybe not.  Although we’ve learned to opt for zero trans fats and search labels for deadly hydrogenated oils, there may be an exception to the no trans fats rule.  Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health have identified a naturally occurring trans fat in dairy that may substantially reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

For many years, studies have shown an association between eating dairy products and lower diabetesrisk.  But how dairy protects against diabetes remained a mystery.  The answer may lie in dairy’s fat.

Trans-palmitoleic acid is a fatty acid found in milk, cheese, yogurt, and butter.  It’s not produced by the body.  It only comes from your diet.

Palmitoleic acid, or trans-palmitoleate, is found almost exclusively in naturally-occurring dairy and meat trans fats.  Unlike trans fat found in hydrogenated vegetable oils, it has not been linked to higher heart disease risk.  In fact, palmitoleic acid is heart healthy.  It also has anti-microbial properties and is a key compound in cell communication.

In a study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Harvard researchers analyzed datafrom the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a prospective cohort study designed to investigate risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in the U.S.

In 2000-2002, they recruited 6,814 adults aged 45–84 years from six regions of the country.  They measured circulating blood levels of trans-palmitoleate.

At the end of 5 years participants with the highest levels of trans-palmitoleate had 6.4% higher LDL cholesterol.  But their triglycerides were 19% lower, their fasting insulin levels were 9% lower, and their systolic blood pressure was 2.4 Hg lower.

Compared to those with the lowest level of the fat, those with the highest levels had half the risk of developing diabetes. 

The results confirmed an earlier Harvard study reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine.  In that study, researchers examined 3,736 participants in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Cardiovascular Health Study.  They had been followed for 20 years to evaluate risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in older adults.

At the beginning of that study, higher levels of trans-palmitoleic acid were associated with healthier levels of blood cholesterol, inflammatory markers, insulin levels, and insulin sensitivity.

During follow-up, participants with the highest levels of trans-palmitoleic acid had a 60% lower risk of developing diabetes.

When the researchers combined the data from the two studies they found that each .05% increase in trans-palmitoleate in the blood levels was associated with a 34% lower risk of diabetes.

The authors called for additional observational studies and controlled trials, noting the magnitude of the association between trans-palmitoleic acid and reduced diabetes risk was striking.  They noted that this trans fat seems to have an extremely strong protective effect, stronger than other things known to be beneficial against diabetes.

In the meantime, enjoy full-fat milk, cheese, and yogurt, preferably from grassfed animals.  And you can add reducing diabetes risk to the 10 other healthy reasons to eat real butter.

But continue to avoid artificial trans fats from hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils.

To learn more about this article go to: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/healthy-trans-fats-slash-diabetes-risk


Glucose Regulation Complex* (Vegetarian) 60 ct.

Blood Sugar

Helps Retain Normal Blood Sugar Levels*

Along with achieving a healthy weight through diet and exercise, Glucose Regulation Complex is a unique blend of scientifically supported ingredients that promote efficient glucose utilization and help keep blood sugar levels steady*

  • Promotes efficient glucose utilization*
  • Keeps blood-sugar levels steady, which may help control cravings*

Come check out my website to learn more about Glucose Regulation Complex.

Do you ever dream about having your own freedom to work where you want? Not have to fight rush hour traffic at a 9 to 5 Job? Come check out these 2 websites: Dteammeeting.com and wes.expoloreabetterlife.com to learn how to work from home with Shaklee. Shaklee has been around for over 50 years.

Regular And Decaf Coffee Both Lower Diabetes Risk

Regular And Decaf Coffee Both Lower Diabetes Risk

Lots of studies have looked at the question of whether coffee drinkers are less likely to develop diabetes.  The short answer is yes they are.

But the question remains, why does coffee seem to lower diabetes risk?  Is it the caffeine?

Researchers from Harvard wanted to know the answer.  They conducted a meta-analysis of 28 prospective studies of coffee with 1,109,272 participants.  Follow-up ranged from 10 months to 20 years.

Their results published in the American Diabetes Association journal Diabetes Care confirmed that drinking coffee was inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes.  And it’s dose dependent.  The more you drink, the lower the risk.  For one cup a day the relative risk dropped to 92%; for three cups a day, to 79%; and for six cups a day it dropped to 67%.

But the researchers also concluded that it doesn’t matter whether your coffee is decaf or high test.  You get the benefits either way.  That seems to indicate that it’s not caffeine’s impact on insulin levels that makes the difference.  Instead, the researchers suggested that other compounds in coffee like polyphenols may be responsible for coffee’s health benefits.

The results are consistent with an earlier prospective cohort study from Harvard researchersthat included 88,259 U.S. women from the Nurses’ Health Study II.  That study concluded that very high consumption was not required to realize coffee’s health benefits.  Their results suggested that drinking just two or more cups per day was associated with a lower diabetes risk.

Other research indicates drinking coffee kills pain, lifts mood, and sharpens the mind.  Drinking decaf coffee may help reduce diabetes risk and bestow additional health benefits while avoiding some of the potential adverse effects of caffeine like the jitters and inability to sleep.

Caffeine is a form of natural pest control protecting the coffee plant from bugs with its bitter taste. A typical cup of regular coffee contains about 100 milligrams of caffeine.

You probably know by now that even coffee advertised as decaf contains caffeine. The general rule of thumb is that the decaffeination process removes from 94 to 99% of the caffeine.  So you should expect your cup of decaf to provide one to six milligrams of caffeine per cup.

Although coffee is considered a psychoactive drug, it is not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.  There’s currently no requirement to disclose caffeine amounts in coffee or other products.

Coffee labeled or sold as “decaffeinated” may contain anywhere between 2 and 13 milligrams of caffeine. A tall decaf Starbucks can have up to 20 milligrams.  So if you are particularly sensitive, beware.

To learn more about this article go to: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/regular-and-decaf-coffee-both-lower-diabetes-risk

 

Your Price (MP): $28.50
Retail Price (SRP): $33.55

Glucose Regulation Complex* (Vegetarian) 60 ct.

 

Blood Sugar

Helps Retain Normal Blood Sugar Levels*

Along with achieving a healthy weight through diet and exercise, Glucose Regulation Complex is a unique blend of scientifically supported ingredients that promote efficient glucose utilization and help keep blood sugar levels steady*

Come check out my website to learn about Glucose Regulation Complex.

Have you ever thought about working from home? Spending time with friends and family? Take a vacation where and when you want? Come check out these 2 websites: Dteammeeting.com and wes.exploreabetterlife.com

Splenda (Sucralose) Found To Have Diabetes-Promoting Effects

Splenda (Sucralose) Found To Have Diabetes-Promoting Effects

 

Promoted for decades as a “safe” sugar alternative, presumably to prevent or reduce symptoms of diabetes, Splenda (sucralose) has been found to have diabetes-promoting effects in human subjects.

The artificial sweetener sucralose, which is approximately 600 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar), and marketed under a variety of brand names, such as Splenda, Cukren, Nevella and SucraPlus, has recently been found to have diabetes-promoting effects in human test subjects, despite containing no calories and being classified as a ‘nonutritive sweetener.’

A new study published in the journal Diabetes Care, lead by researchers at the Center for Human Nutrition, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, set out to test the metabolic effects of sucralose in obese subjects who did not use nonnutritive sweeteners.

Seventeen subjects underwent a 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test on two separate occasions preceded by consuming either sucralose (experimental condition) or water (control condition) 10 min before the glucose load in a randomized crossover design.

The results were reported as follows:

Compared with the control condition, sucralose ingestion caused 1) a greater incremental increase in peak plasma glucose concentrations (4.2 ± 0.2 vs. 4.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L; P = 0.03), 2) a 20 ± 8% greater incremental increase in insulin area under the curve (AUC) (P < 0.03), 3) a 22 ± 7% greater peak insulin secretion rate (P < 0.02), 4) a 7 ± 4% decrease in insulin clearance (P = 0.04), and 5) a 23 ± 20% decrease in SI (P = 0.01).

In other words, a single dose of sucralose lead to a .6 mmol/L increase in plasma glucose concentrations, a 20% increase in insulin levels, a 22% greater peak insulin secretion rate, and a 7% decrease in insulin clearance, an indication of decreased insulin sensitivity.

They concluded

These data demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume NNS.

Discussion

Despite the fact that preapproval research on sucralose found a wide range of adverse health effects in exposed animals [see The Bitter Truth about Splenda], national and international food safety regulatory bodies, including the FDA, now consider it completely safe for daily human consumption.*

The same applies for synthetic sweeteners like aspartame, which despite its well-known link with brain damage and over 40 documented adverse health effects, is safety approved in 90 nations.

Industry influence largely accounts for the fact that synthetic chemicals like asparatame, neotame, saccharin and sucralose are being foisted onto the public as ‘safe’ non-calorie sweeteners, despite obvious research to the contrary, and the fact that stevia, the non-calorie natural alternative, has over 1500 years of documented safe use.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), for instance, does nothing to hide its explicit partnership with McNeil Nutritionals, maker of Splenda, despite the obvious conflict of interest. On its website, the ADA describes McNeil Nutritionals as a “national strategic partner ” and lauds them as “committed to helping people and their families with diabetes by focusing on the overall nutritional needs of the diabetes community.”  McNeil Nutritionals sponsors the ADA’s “Recipe of the Day,” along with a variety of educational tools and information for consumers and healthcare professionals.

Despite these cozy relationships, the research on sucralose’s adverse health effects continues to accumulate.  Some of the more recent research on the chemical indicate that it may contribute to the following health and environmental problems:

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A researcher from UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark NJ, proposes that sucralose may be causing a global increase in cases of IBS, including both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. [i] In an article titled “What made Canada become a country with the highest incidence of inflammatory bowel disease: could sucralose be the culprit?”, author Xiaofa Qin describes how Canada, which once had one of the lowest rates of IBS in the world, attained the highest levels after being the first country in the world to approve the use of sucralose in thousands of consumer products in 1991.
  • Harms Gut Flora and Gastrointestinal Health: A 2008 study found that the administration of sucralose to rats at a dose far below the US FDA Acceptable Daily intake level resulted in: 1) a decrease in the numbers of a wide range of beneficial gut bacteria. 2) “increase in fecal pH.”  3) “enhanced expression levels of P-gp, CYP3A4, and CYP2D1, which are known to limit the bioavailability of orally administered drugs.”
  • Migraines: A report was published in the journal Headache in 2006 indicating that physicians should be mindful of the possibility that sucralose can trigger migraines.
  • Environmental Persistence: Like many persistent organic pollutants in the pesticide category, sucralose is exceptionally resistant to degradation, both through environmental processes (microbial degradation, hydrolysis, soil sorption) and advanced treatment processes (chlorination, ozonation, sorption to activated carbon, and UV radiation). Sucralose, after all, was discovered accidentally by pesticide researchers, and is chemically related to DDT, a chlorinated hydrocarbon.  Some researchers now consider it an ideal “tracer of anthropogenic activity,” which is true also of lethal radioisotopes such as uranium 238 and plutonium 239, due to their resistance to degradation.  Indeed, recent research found that sucralose has a low rate of removal (11%) in drinking water tested that presently serves 28 million people.
  • Environmental Toxicity: Sucralose was recently found to alter the physiological and behavioral status of crustaceans, leading researchers to warn that the chemical will likely have wider ecological consequences.

To learn more about this article go to: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/splenda-sucralose-found-have-diabetes-promoting-effects-1?page=1

 

 

Glucose Regulation Complex* (Vegetarian) 60 ct.

Blood Sugar

Helps Retain Normal Blood Sugar Levels*

Along with achieving a healthy weight through diet and exercise, Glucose Regulation Complex is a unique blend of scientifically supported ingredients that promote efficient glucose utilization and help keep blood sugar levels steady*

Come check out my website to learn more about Glucose Regulation Complex.

 

How would you like to have the opportunity to be able to work your hours from the comfort of your home? Come check out these 2 websites: Dteammeeting.com and wes.exploreabetterlife.com to learn how. Shaklee has been in business for over 50 years.

Chocolate Lovers Lower Their Diabetes Risk

Chocolate Lovers Lower Their Diabetes Risk

Attention chocolate lovers.  Here’s another good reason to indulge your chocolate addiction every day WITHOUT the guilt.  Researchers have found that long-term consumption of chocolate is associated with a reduced diabetes risk.

Using data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Cohort study, researchers followed 7,802 participants for more than 13 years.  ARIC is conducted and supported by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute.  Participants aged 45–64 years are drawn from households in North Carolina, Minnesota, Maryland, and Mississippi.

Participants were examined every three years and completed food frequency questions on their chocolate consumption.

The results showed that people who ate one ounce of chocolate 2-6 times per week had a 34% lower risk of diabetes compared to those who ate chocolate less than monthly.  Just eating chocolate 1-4 times per month lowered diabetes risk by 13%.

But more wasn’t better.  Eating chocolate more than once a day decreased diabetes risk by 18%.  That’s good but only about half the benefit of eating it just 2-6 times per week. Why?

The researchers speculated that flavanols in chocolate help the body metabolize glucose.  But going overboard with chocolate could increase calories and fat to such an extent that they outweigh the flavanols’ benefits in metabolizing glucose.

An earlier Japanese study had also found that long-term chocolate use was associated with a 35% lower diabetes risk in men.[i]

Prior short-term human studies had shown that eating dark chocolate[ii] or high-flavanol cocoa[iii]every day improves insulin sensitivity.

And Australian researchers recently estimated that eating just one ounce of chocolate per day can reduce cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and strokes, in people with metabolic syndrome, a precursor to diabetes.

In fact, it’s been suggested that chocolate’s heart health benefits give statin drugs a run for their money.

Chocolate also relieves stress and lowers blood pressure.

What kind of chocolate should you eat?

One limitation of the current study was that the participants didn’t specify what kind of chocolate they ate.  In fact, the questionnaire asked how frequently they ate one ounce of “chocolate bars or pieces, such as Hershey’s, Plain M&M’s, Snickers, Reese’s.”

Those mass market chocolate junk foods are hardly the best choices.  Dark chocolate is significantly richer in flavanols than other chocolates.  Look for chocolate with 70% or more cacao content.

Also, for the best health benefits try to find organic, fair-trade products if possible.

To learn more about this article go to:  http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/chocolate-lovers-lower-their-diabetes-risk

 

 

 

Glucose Regulation Complex* (Vegetarian) 60 ct.

 

Blood Sugar

Helps Retain Normal Blood Sugar Levels*

Along with achieving a healthy weight through diet and exercise, Glucose Regulation Complex is a unique blend of scientifically supported ingredients that promote efficient glucose utilization and help keep blood sugar levels steady*

Come check out my website to learn more about Glucose Regulation Complex.

 

Would you like to be able to spend more time with family and friends? Be able to go on vacation when you want to? Work from the comfort of your home? Come check out these 2 websites: Dteammeeting.com and wes.exploreabetterlife.com to learn how to work from home with Shaklee.

Nuts Drop Risks of Pancreatic Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Disease

Nuts Drop Risks of Pancreatic Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Disease

Adding to the many benefits of nuts including reducing heart disease, researchers from Harvard Medical School have determined that increasing our intake of nuts decreases our risk of diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

The researchers followed 75,680 women from the Nurses’ Health Study – started in 1976 and expanded in 1989. The researchers measured nut consumption among the subjects and updated it every two to four years.

Those who ate at least one ounce of nuts twice a week had a 35% lower incidence of pancreatic cancer and a 32% lower incidence of diabetes.

This effect remained after cancelling out other known causes of pancreatic cancer. Those included higher BMI, less physical activity, greater consumption of red meat and less consumption of fruits and vegetables.

Other research has found that eating more nuts helps prevent disease. In fact, another study from Harvard – this from the School of Public Health – found that eating more nuts and peanut butter reduced the risk of diabetes. Though peanuts are not really nuts – they are legumes – they are still considered nuts among most nutritionists and researchers.

Those who ate an ounce of nuts at least five times a week had 27% lower incidence of diabetes compared to those who ate no nuts. And those who ate an ounce of peanuts or peanut butter at least five times a week had 21% lower incidence of diabetes.

Other studies have shown that nuts reduce cholesterol, and reduce heart disease. A large review of research by scientists at California’s Loma Linda University found that consuming nuts at least four times a week reduces the risk of coronary heart disease by 37%. And each weekly serving of nuts reduces the risk of heart disease by over 8%.

Nut Allergy? Learn how to reverse food allergies

The reasons for nuts’ ability to reduce cancer, diabetes and heart disease relate to a combination of their healthy fats, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals and other phytonutrients.

The Many Nutritional Benefits of Nuts

Nuts contain a balance of healthy fats. These include monounsaturated fats like oleic acid, polyunsaturated fats like linoleic acid, and long-chain polyunsaturates such as alpha-linolenic acid – in some (like walnuts and pecans) but not all nuts. Meanwhile, saturated fat levels are balanced, but reasonably low in nuts.

Almonds, for example, have 4% saturated fat, 32% monounsaturated fat, 12% polyunsaturated fat.

Nuts are also high in phytonutrients such as tocopherols and B vitamins, as well as phenols. Nuts also contain phytosterols – shown to be heart healthy as discussed above.

Phytosterols reduce cholesterol absorption because they displace cholesterol from microscopic intestinal biomolecules called micelles. This prevents the displaced cholesterol from being absorbed through the gut.

As such, phytosterols have been shown to reduce LDL – those oxidation-friendly containers that transport cholesterol (often incorrectly called “bad cholesterol” – it is “bad” but not cholesterol).

A review of research from the Netherlands’ Wageningen University found that 2.15 grams of phytosterols per day reduced LDL by an average of 8.8%.

Nuts’ antioxidant effects aren’t often considered. Nuts have significant antioxidant effects within the body. In a crossover study from Thailand’s Mahidol University found that a diet with increased intake of walnuts resulted in higher blood antioxidant values than either a diet with increased fish intake or a control diet.

Less known is the fact that nuts contain healthy doses of magnesium, calcium and potassium, and many contain good quantities of selenium. Brazil nuts are one of the richest sources of selenium, at 540 micrograms per ounce, according to the USDA database.

Most nuts are also complete proteins, containing all the essential amino acids for the body to build its own proteins, without the acidic plasma side effects. An ounce of nuts will typically contain 4-5 grams of plant-based protein, as well as a few grams of fiber to boot.

Nut processing has mixed effects upon their nutritional content. Blanching of nuts like almonds and pistachios can destroy many of the nut’s antioxidants, but roasting seems to preserve many nuts’ antioxidant phenolic compounds – at least better than blanching.

To learn more about this article go to: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/nuts-drop-risks-pancreatic-cancer-diabetes-heart-disease

Glucose Regulation Complex* (Vegetarian) 60 ct.

Helps Retain Normal Blood Sugar Levels*

Along with achieving a healthy weight through diet and exercise, Glucose Regulation Complex is a unique blend of scientifically supported ingredients that promote efficient glucose utilization and help keep blood sugar levels steady*

Come check out my website to learn more about Glucose Regulation Complex.

Would you like more freedom to do what you want? Like spend more time with family? Going on Trips? Not worry about bills? Come check out these 2 websites: Dteammeeting.com and wes.exploreabetterlife.com. To learn how to work with Shaklee at home.